Sunday, 17 June 2018

Quilting Matters

There are many considerations when choosing what to stitch on a quilt - not the least of which is budget.

A pantograph is an economical choice, but people often wonder if it would do their quilt justice. Would it really look good stitched over applique?

It certainly can!

Client Quilt - a feathery panto suits the heritage feel of this hand-appliqued beauty
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What about over hand piecing?

Yes again!

Client Quilt - entirely pieced by hand. Feathers were top choice again, for good reason.
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Client Quilt - quilting enhances without overwhelming. The quilt remains the "star". (ha - stars, really!)
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It's important to match the character of the panto to the character of the quilt. The scale of the quilting motif should also suit the size of the piecing. Generally, smaller piecing would benefit from denser quilting, and vice versa.

Much as I love custom quilting, many quilts shine just as brightly with an overall design.

Client Quilt - swirly texture complements geometric piecing.
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The purpose of a quilt (is it for the bed or wall? for show or daily use? to celebrate a special occasion? is it a comfort quilt?), its intended recipient (adult? kid? loved one? charity? raffle?) - and even who is paying the bill - also play into the quilting decision.

Remember that a carefully chosen pantograph can be a very successful option, from both a design and a budgetary point of view.

Try, Learn, & Grow!
Carole

Friday, 15 June 2018

Good News!

I've been working toward this since January 2015, so this is VERY good news - I passed my exam and am officially a CQA/ACC Certified Quilt Judge!

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Click on this post from January 2015 to see the first (of many) required art and design exercise(s).

The design exercises were evaluated by the Judge Certification Program (JCP) instructors to determine a candidate's readiness for the program. (Maybe they're also a test of dedication? It took me six months to complete this portion of the program!)

In addition to the exercises, there were required readings and the expectation of ongoing self-directed learning.
(Not a problem!)

Testing a theory is one way to learn
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In June 2015, I was accepted into an intensive four-day workshop on judging and writing critiques. After much learning, testing, observation, and evaluation, I officially became a CQA Apprentice Judge - whew!


2015 head shot for publication
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I then had three years in which to gain judging experience and write critiques for hundreds of quilts. With each experience I could feel myself growing into the role.

Not gonna lie. A couple of times I wanted to ditch the whole thing.
But then encouraging words would find my ear and I'd press on.
(Thank you, Mom. Thank you, Elinor. Thank you, Anna, Kathy, Judy, and Joyce. And, THANK YOU to the show organizers who gave me positive feedback and did the extra paperwork required for my apprenticeship!)

Last, but not least, came the final certification exam: a mock judging at Quilt Canada's National Juried Show. I expected to be nervous, but nerves were mild and short lived. My focus was on the task of judging, not on my evaluators. After the first two quilts, it felt like "just" another show! (I know, right??? GROWTH, I tell ya.)

More Good News!
Laina's Youth Challenge entry won first place in her age group in the judged competition!


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The challenge theme was, "Going on a Journey", and the challenge fabric was the one Laina used in her pathway.

Riley's quilt also hung in the show, which was an exciting first for him!

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His title was actually, "Journey to the Center of the Earth: The Gem Cavern". Not sure what happened online (space restriction?), but the sign with his quilt was accurate.

A few quilts in the youngest age category (5 - 10, maybe?) What a creative bunch!
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May your day be a "good news" kind of day, too!

Try, Learn, & Grow!
Carole